China Imposes New Sanctions on North Korea

China Imposes New Sanctions on North KoreaSep.24 — China is calling for restraint on all sides after more accusations and abuse from the United States and North Korea. Beijing also imposed new sanctions on Pyongyang, restricting deliveries of some oil products to the north. Bloomberg’s Tom Mackenzie reports on “Bloomberg Markets: Asia.”

Weibo Corp (WB): Can the Explosive Rally Last?

Weibo Corp (WB): Can the Explosive Rally Last?Social media operator Weibo Corp (ADR) (NASDAQ:WB) is often called the Twitter Inc (NYSE:TWTR) of China. Weibo stock, on the other hand, has posted a blistering return of 112% during the same period. Consider too that its market cap is roughly $23 billion, which is $10 billion higher than TWTR’s.

SAP to buy customer management software firm Gigya

SAP to buy customer management software firm GigyaFRANKFURT/JERUSALEM, Sept 24 (Reuters) – SAP, Europe’s biggest technology company, has agreed to buy U.S.-Israeli customer identity software company Gigya to strengthen its position in the booming market for online customer relationship marketing, the company said on Sunday. The deal, terms of which were not disclosed, will tie together Gigya’s user identity access and management platform with SAP’s Hybris customer profile data-matching software so businesses can market services to online customers.

Opposition from GOP senators grows, jeopardizes health bill

Opposition from GOP senators grows, jeopardizes health billWASHINGTON (AP) — Republican opposition to the last-ditch GOP health care bill swelled to near-fatal numbers Sunday as Sen. Susan Collins all but closed the door on supporting the teetering effort to scrap the Obama health care law and Sen. Ted Cruz said that “right now” he doesn’t back it.

Fears for thousands of British jobs as US court prepares to rule on Bombardier subsidy row

Fears for thousands of British jobs as US court prepares to rule on Bombardier subsidy rowA court decision in America that could threaten thousands of British jobs is expected as early as today. The US trade court is due to give its initial ruling on a claim by aerospace giant Boeing that Canadian rival ­Bombardier sold its C-Series airliners at knock-down prices – a practice known as “trade dumping”. Boeing is arguing that the only ­reason Bombardier was able to agree to sell up to 125 of the aircraft to US ­carrier Delta at bargain rates was that the ­company received state subsidies. The wings for Bombardier’s C-Series airliners are built in Belfast, where the company is the region’s biggest private employer with almost 5,000 staff. Bombardier has said the aircraft’s success is “critical” to the future of its Northern Ireland operations. Unions say about 25pc of Bombardier’s staff in Belfast are employed working on C-Series production but this is expected to rise to about 60pc in four years’ time. Wings for the C-Series are made in Belfast Boeing claims that government support for Bombardier – which included about £75m from the UK to help the ­C-Series and $1bn (£0.74bn) of financial aid from the Quebec government – was illegal. The US company alleged Bombardier agreed to sell the C-Series jets for about $20m each to Delta but claimed the planes cost about $33m to produce, and it was the state subsidies that allowed it to offer them at what Boeing called “absurdly low” prices. Boeing has taken its fight to the US International Trade Commission in the hope of sanctions that could block the sale, casting doubts over the future of the C-Series programme and putting thousands of jobs in the UK at risk. In a statement, Boeing said: “This is a ­classic case of dumping, and it was made possible by a major injection of public funds. This violation of global trade law is the only issue at stake at the US International Trade Commission – one sale in the US at a price ­millions lower than Bombardier is charging in the Canadian market.” Brazilian company Embraer – which produces aircraft of a similar size to Bombardier – has launched a similar case against the Canadian company at the World Trade Organisation. Boeing wants to stop state support creating a new competitor Commentators have pointed out that Boeing does not build a plane that the C-Series competes with, meaning that it did not lose out on sales because of the Delta deal. ­Instead, Boeing is seen as trying to stop Bombardier from becoming a direct competitor in the future, one that has been able to grow because of state subsidies. It fears that ­Bombardier could build a full range of airliners that compete with Boeing products, as Airbus does now. Airbus and Boeing now have a 50:50 market share producing large airliners, and the US company is determined not to see the past repeat itself, further eroding its customer base. Both Airbus and Boeing are locked in a huge legal battle at the WTO over state ­subsidies, each claiming that the other received illegal backing. A spokesman for Bombardier said: “We will not speculate on the impact on our Belfast site should the Boeing petition be successful. However, the ­C-Series programme is critical to the long-term future of our Northern ­Ireland operations.”

Merkel Says No Govt. Can Be Created Without Us

Merkel Says No Govt. Can Be Created Without UsSep.24 — Angela Merkel won a fourth term as German chancellor in a federal election that lifted a far-right party into parliament for the first time since the immediate aftermath of World War II, according to exit polls that point to growing polarization in Europe’s biggest economy.

Sir Richard Branson is on the hunt for the Usain Bolt of Jamaica's entrepreneurs

Sir Richard Branson is on the hunt for the Usain Bolt of Jamaica's entrepreneursThe air is full of pale yellow butterflies when Debbie Turner, founder of Turner Innovations, pulls up outside the Branson Centre of Entrepreneurship in her pickup. It’s the end of August in Kingston, Jamaica. This phenomenon will take place for just two weeks, as the cloudless sulphur butterfly emerges from its cocoon in the lignum vitae, Jamaica’s national tree. It’s 30 degrees in the shade – there will be no sign of Hurricane Irma for another fortnight – and Turner rushes into the air-conditioned building. She opens a bag of small, red and dried fruits and hands them around. Everyone will want my machine. It reduces labour by 95pc and increases production five-fold “This is sorrel,” she says. It is this unusual fruit that first brought Turner to the Branson Centre in 2012. “My husband’s friend had abandoned a field of sorrel because the cost to reap was greater than the crop was worth,” she explains. “It was left to rot.” Sorrel, which is also known as hibiscus, is primarily used as the base for herbal teas around the globe. With a flavour similar to cranberry, yet even more nutrient dense, it is grown in 22 countries but is complex to harvest. This is because the fruit, which looks like a rose, contains a seed that must be extracted manually. “One evening, my husband came in, and he was holding the seed in one hand and the fruit in the other,” Turner says. “He’d invented a machine that could do it automatically.” The 43-year-old Turner, who is dyslexic, came to the centre seeking access to its entrepreneur training programme, determined to create a business plan for her husband’s invention. “The centre helped me to understand that our idea was feasible,” she says. Debbie Turner, founder of Turner Innovations, speaks to Sir Richard Branson The market for Turner’s machine is vast. According to market research firm Mintel, hibiscus is one of the world’s top four floral flavours, alongside jasmine, elderflower and rose. China and Thailand are the largest producers. “Everyone will want my machine,” Turner says, simply. “It reduces labour by 95pc and increases production five-fold.” It is this kind of business, one that could appeal to a massive addressable global market, that the Branson Centre was created to incubate. The organisation aims to stimulate enterprise and support local start-ups by training entrepreneurs in essential business skills, as well as providing access to finance. “Jamaica is brimming with hungry entrepreneurs with a sense of passion for business,” Sir Richard Branson, the chief ambassador of the centre, explains. “Jamaicans have a strong sense of creativity and entrepreneurialism.” Sir Richard already has one such centre in Johannesburg, South Africa, and the Caribbean outpost was launched in Montego Bay in 2015, before moving to Kingston earlier this year. Mo’Bay – as the locals call it – is home to many of the island’s resorts, but Kingston is the heart of Jamaican commerce. According to Sir Richard, his organisation is having an “immediate” effect on the local economy. “On average, each entrepreneur who leaves the Branson Centre generates four new jobs that support four new families,” he says. “That grass roots impact of job creation cannot be underestimated.” It is crucial that more entrepreneurs like Turner are helped to flourish in Jamaica. Its economy has been stagnant for decades, growing less than 1pc per annum for the past 20 years. “The economic crisis in the Nineties sent many people and businesses bankrupt,” says Lisandra Rickards, chief executive of the centre. “Interest rates remained high for a long time. People became very risk averse, and there was real trauma among the entrepreneurial class.” Jamaica used to mine bauxite, the raw material used to make aluminium, but the industry was crippled by the last financial crisis. Business process outsourcing is a fast-growing new sector but the economy depends heavily on the 3.5m tourists that descend on the island each year. Sir Richard Branson’s private island, Necker, was badly damaged during Hurricane Irma  Credit: Virgin.com/PA But it is hard to rely on tourism when your country is prone to natural disasters. The recent hurricane that battered the Caribbean – severely damaging Sir Richard’s island home, Necker – bypassed Jamaica, but only just. “Hurricane Irma has had a devastating effect on the wider Caribbean community,” says Rickards. “Thankfully, Jamaica avoided the path of the hurricane.” She is concerned about the future, however: “This season has been unprecedented with more intense and more frequent systems.” The Branson Centre was created, in part, to reduce Jamaica’s reliance on tourism, which represents 50pc of GDP. Yet it is funded by one of the biggest travel operators in the region: Virgin Holidays. Joe Thompson, its managing director, is aware of the irony. “We want to highlight that tourism can be a force for good,” he says. “We’ve pledged our support until 2021.” On average, each entrepreneur who leaves the Branson Centre generates four new jobs that support four new familiesSir Richard Branson Virgin Holidays donates £1 for every adult and 50p for every child who visits the Caribbean. This represents a rolling donation of about £200,000 per year, and the business has invested £1.2m in total, to date. Sandals, the leisure giant, is another backer. Rickards, a 33-year-old Harvard Business School MBA graduate, became chief executive of the centre in early 2017, after working her way up the organisation over four years. She moved back to her homeland following a successful career in strategy, working for consultancy giant Bain & Co. “My mission here is to solve the economic growth challenge,” she says. “Most of our talent leaves Jamaica, goes overseas and stays there. The brain drain is a big problem. There are 3m of us here, and 3m living abroad. But in New York, I was just a cog in the machine, here I can make an impact.” The Caribbean centre employs just 10 staff. Some 1,150 entrepreneurs have completed the centre’s basic training programme, either in person or virtually. Some 156 entrepreneurs have been accepted into its advanced programme, accessing its database of 300 mentors. To try to encourage ambitious entrepreneurs to take calculated risks and develop their ventures, the centre also offers these advanced students two funding streams: loans with 4pc interest, and a grant programme, using funds donated from the Arthur Guinness Foundation or provided by the Development Bank of Jamaica. It has given out $270,000 (£200,000) in loans to 10 entrepreneurs, and helped a further 10 with grants of around $20,000. These businesses have achieved 132pc growth, on average. Your True Shade, a make-up brand founded by chemical engineer Dianne Plummer, creates foundations to match every conceivable Caribbean shade of skin Another business that has benefited from the centre’s support is Your True Shade, a make-up brand founded by chemical engineer Dianne Plummer. Her range of foundations match every conceivable Caribbean shade of skin.  The centre advised her to look beyond her home market, and target Caribbean diaspora worldwide. She has now made sales in the UK and the Netherlands, and is in talks with customers in the US. As for Turner, she has just received the blueprint that will enable her to manufacture her husband’s machine commercially. She has just sold her first machine to one of the country’s biggest conglomerates: the Jamaica Broilers Group. Sorrel is remarkably hardy and drought resistant, which makes it an ideal industry for Jamaica. “Lots of land here is not being used,” says Turner. “If we could convince farmers that this is a profitable business, Jamaica could become the world leader in this market.” Turner not only wants to drive forward her country’s economy, she wants to inspire Jamaica’s entrepreneurs – in the same way that Usain Bolt has inspired its athletes, and Bob Marley inspired its reggae artists. “Jamaicans are no good at sharing their ideas, and that has to change,” she says. “We call it ‘crab in a barrel’. Have you ever seen crabs trying to climb out of a barrel? As soon as one makes it up the side, the others pull it back down. I want to get out of the barrel and show it can be done.”

Are OPEC’s Hands Tied?

OPEC is able to take a breather as it debates whether to deepen cuts or extend its production cut agreement, but things could soon become more complicated

S&P 500; US Indexes Fundamental Weekly Forecast – Tightening Monetary Policy Means Economy is Strong

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US Dollar Index (DX) Futures Technical Analysis – Bullish Tone Could Develop Over 92.34 This Week

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